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Welcome to our Blog

Our blog lets us share with you current news and views from the world of HR and Global Mobility which we hope you will find interesting, informative and even entertaining. Along with our own thoughts and opinions we will bring you external articles and updates on items we think may matter to you.

We hope you enjoy reading our blog.

07
Nov
2017
Why International Assignments Make Good Business Sense
Many employees jump at the chance of an international assignment. Exciting challenges await… new role, new culture, a fresh start abroad. What are the advantages…
25
Oct
2017
3 Ways to De-Stress International Relocations
Employees are likely to be excited about their imminent global assignments – and a little anxious too. So what can HR managers do to minimise…
06
Oct
2017
BTR Wins Platinum Award
BTR International Receives Top Level, Commitment to Excellence Platinum Award at Cartus 2017 Global Network Conference.
22
Sep
2017
The New Normal of Global Mobility
This year’s report from the RES Forum looks at ‘Flexibility, Diversity and Data Mastery’ within global mobility – and how these traits are becoming the…
07
Sep
2017
5 Traits of Successful Global Employees
Global talent is predicted to reach 3.5 billion by 2030. However the McKinsey Global Institute’s report also forecasts a shortage of skilled workers. The result?…
24
Aug
2017
Global Mobility: Predictions for 2020
The last decade has seen a 25% growth in global mobility. A further 50% rise is forecast by 2020 says pwc.
09
Aug
2017
Work Friendships Help Relocations
Good relationships at work help international assignees to settle faster and stay longer in their new role.
27
Jul
2017
Spotting Reluctant Relocations
For most people, relocating overseas is a little daunting and very exciting. However some people simply don’t relish international assignments. Spotting the signs can prevent…
03
Jul
2017
It’s Official: London is Europe’s most dynamic city
A new report places London at the top of the list of Europe’s most dynamic cities. What is this based upon?
26
Jun
2017
3 Global Mobility Trends
Today’s International Relocation policies need to recognise three trends in order to provide best practice…
Why International Assignments Make Good Business Sense

Why International Assignments Make Good Business Sense

Many employees jump at the chance of an international assignment. Exciting challenges await… new role, new culture, a fresh start abroad. What are the advantages for the organisations involved?
Increasingly, companies are investing in global talent mobility. Global talent consultants MSI offer four reasons that organisations should introduce and develop international assignments:

1. Market Expansion
Research shows that expansion into existing markets is the biggest reason why employees are transferred overseas. International relocations can help a small office become a strong foothold abroad.

The other major factor for sending employees to another country is expansion into new markets. In fact, research shows that this is almost as important as moves to existing markets. (52% participants gave expanding existing markets as the main reason for internal relocations; 49% cited growing new markets as their main motivation for sending employees overseas.)

2. Develop Top Talent
International relocations involving existing employees help to:
• Project a consistent corporate identity
• Demonstrate commitment to employees’ personal development
• Provide the international experience often needed for leadership roles
• Show that employees are valued as they are trusted to represent the organisation overseas

3. Seize Opportunities Quickly
Existing employees understand the company’s culture, processes and plans. They can help the organisation to move quickly and streamline operations within global markets. This is especially important in markets where there is a local shortage suitably qualified and/or experienced talent.

4. A Different View
MSI explains that: “Being immersed in a new culture boosts creative problem solving and reveals valuable new ways of doing things, and the employee can both share these exciting insights with the company and apply them in his day-to-day work.”

Is your organisation seizing the potential offered by international relocations? AT BTR International, we make global moves as stress-free and cost-effective as possible.

To find out more without obligation, contact Louise Chilcott, Global Move and Relocation Specialist at BTR International. Email her via .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or call her on +44 (0) 1582 495495.


Image courtesy of rajcreationzs at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
3 Ways to De-Stress International Relocations

3 Ways to De-Stress International Relocations

Employees are likely to be excited about their imminent global assignments – and a little anxious too. So what can HR managers do to minimise the stress involved?
Here are three top tips:

1. Provide Information

Providing individuals with details of their new assignment and location will help them to make informed decisions about if, when and how they relocate.

In particular, ensure that people are aware of relocation support that they are entitled too. This should go beyond the financial details. Understanding that they are able to receive cross-cultural training, language lessons and support for partners and families - if they are moving too - can be extremely reassuring. As well as easing stress levels, this also helps employers and assignees to set realistic goals for their new role – both professionally and personally.

2. Remove Uncertainty

Housing, schools and transport are key aspects to everyday life. Uncertainty within these areas creates stress. Get these things right and people settle into their new homes and roles more quickly, which is the common goal for everyone involved with the relocation.

If possible, assignees should visit their new location before moving. Temporary accommodation gives people a chance to get to know their new area before choosing their long-term home.

Support with settling in includes services such as arranging for utilities, bank accounts and healthcare to be in place. This eases the transition into day-to-day life in a new country.

3. Communicate


There is often a flurry of communication between employers and assignees prior to relocations. This needs to continue once people arrive in their new country and start their new roles.

Loneliness is often the biggest worry for international assignees. Putting people in touch with future colleagues or other employees already working in the new location offers ‘front line’ information and the chance to ask questions. There will usually be an expat community that people can connect with – however combining this with learning the language and mixing with locals helps assignees to feel ‘at home’ more quickly.

Plus – treat repatriation at the end of an assignment just as carefully as the initial relocation. Although there are less unknown elements involved, slotting back into ‘home’ life needs planning and support too.


“These three tips seem simple enough,” says Louise Chilcott, Global Move and Relocation Specialist at BTR International. “However not applying enough time to them is how many international relocations become more stressful than necessary.

“We’ve helped assignees and their families move and settle abroad for over 25 years. Our goal is to make corporate relocations as stress-free as possible. That’s something that our clients and assignees value too.”

If you would like to discuss your global assignments and how to manage them as smoothly as possible, contact Louise for an informal discussion. Email her via .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or call her on +44 (0) 1582 495495.
BTR Wins Platinum Award

BTR Wins Platinum Award

BTR International Receives Top Level, Commitment to Excellence Platinum Award at Cartus 2017 Global Network Conference.
We were honoured for our outstanding performance at Cartus Corporation’s 2017 Global Network Conference, held September 25 – 26 in Chicago, Illinois, at the Hyatt Regency, McCormick Place. The Cartus Global Network is Cartus’ industry-leading worldwide service provider network. Each year, Cartus recognizes the companies and individuals in the Network who have provided extraordinary service to its customers and clients worldwide. The theme of this year’s conference was “Innovate.”

BTR International was named winner of the Global Network Commitment to Excellence Platinum Award for its exceptional service results, the highest level award a supplier can achieve through service performance. This award recognizes a supplier’s measureable commitment to excellence and is presented to Global Network service providers who have distinguished themselves by achieving critical performance metrics.

"BTR International consistently demonstrates an above-and-beyond commitment to our customers – and to Cartus,” said Mike Brannan, senior vice president, Global Supply Chain Management. “Our Global Network providers are a crucial part of the Cartus team, because they minimize the stress that our customers often feel when they’re making important relocation decisions. This award acknowledges their unparalleled work ethic, compassion, professionalism and commitment to excellence.”

“We are delighted to have won such a prestigious award,” says Louise Chilcott, Global Move and Relocation Specialist at BTR International. “We always strive to provide an outstanding service to every one of our clients and are proud that these standards have been recognised on a global platform such as the Cartus Global Network Conference.”

She adds: “Cartus has always maintained rigorous criteria and performance standards for their Network providers, but also for the recipients of the Platinum Commitment to Excellence Award. We’re proud to be a part of Cartus’ Global Network, and to have received this honour, which recognizes our mutual commitment to quality, superior service and to finding innovative ways to provide that service in the changing face of relocation.”

To find out more about the services provided by BTR International, contact Louise via .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or call her on +44 (0) 1582 495495.
The New Normal of Global Mobility

The New Normal of Global Mobility

This year’s report from the RES Forum looks at ‘Flexibility, Diversity and Data Mastery’ within global mobility – and how these traits are becoming the new norm in our fast-moving sector.
The report looks at five key issues:

1. Global mobility data
Most companies see a variety of benefits to discovering and visualizing useful global mobility (GM) information. Data analytics allows international organisations to source evidence-based conclusions. The report states that The GM data analytics field is still immature and relatively neglected within companies. However, the field is gathering energy, speed and focus.

2. Managing age diversity in global mobility
The report identifies a number of trends within international talent mobility. In particular, the personal drivers that motivate different age groups are highlighted:
• Personal drivers were most important to early-mid careerists (Generation Y, Millennials)
• Expatriation package was most important to mid-peak careerists (Generation X)
• All age groups sought sense, fulfilment and career progression. However, career impact was more important to early-mid as well as mid-peak careerists compared to their older counterparts
• Professional challenge was most important to early-mid careerists (Generation Y, Millennials) in comparison to the other generations
• Younger expatriates perceive a stronger need to expand their social capital even though it is probably older assignees who utilize their social networks more for work purposes
• Partner and dual career considerations as well as family and educational concerns are more pertinent for mid-peak careerists (Generation X) than for other age groups
• Security concerns are more important to mid-peak and late careerists (Generation X and Baby Boomers) while early-mid careerists (Generation Y, Millennials) are more concerned about the attractiveness of specific host locations

3. The Brexit decisions and its impact on global mobility
The report summarises: “We live in an increasingly volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous environment that is likely to present both opportunities and threats.” It recommends that international organisations devote leadership attention and creative capabilities to understanding opportunities as well as the threats presented by Brexit.

4. Organisational development and talent management
In-depth understanding of assignees and their families combined with innovative thinking should shape global mobility practices. Many challenges faced by global companies are interlinked, dynamic and very complex. They are substantial challenges to overcome and impact greatly upon the success of global mobility programmes.

5. Reward package design
Assignment packages vary substantially depending on a range of factors. On average, short term assignees had a less generous deal than long term expatriates; business-driven and strategic needs based assignments were more generously rewarded than developmental assignments.

“The report shows that global talent mobility is increasingly vital for business success, “says Louise Chilcott, Global Move and Relocation Specialist at BTR International. “To gain the best results from international assignments, organisation must have a robust yet flexible relocation policy and a support package that suits assignees’ individual requirements and locations.”

If you would like to discuss your organisation’s global mobility without obligation, contact Louise via .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  or call her on +44 (1) 01582 495495.

To read the RES Forum’s report summary, click here.


Image courtesy of jscreationzs at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
5 Traits of Successful Global Employees

5 Traits of Successful Global Employees

Global talent is predicted to reach 3.5 billion by 2030. However the McKinsey Global Institute’s report also forecasts a shortage of skilled workers. The result? The competition for global workers is set to intensify…
A five-year study of the global workforce by Tsedal Neeley highlights five traits of successful global workers. International recruitment teams should be aware of these attributes, strengthening their organisations’ talent mobility during increasingly competitive times.

Neeley says: “Rather than assuming we’ll work in one location, in our native culture, we will need new skills, attitudes, and behaviors that help us work across cultures. Our ways of thinking about careers, colleagues, and collaboration will need to become more flexible and adaptable.”

Often, international assignees need to work across different countries, languages and cultures. Neely suggests five traits that help global workers to be successful:
 
1. Positive indifference. Embracing cultural differences rather than seeing them as obstacles helps global workers to adjust to international relocation. This is particularly important of less important differences such as the need to wear identity badges, for example.

“Positive indifference is important for two reasons, explains Neely. “One, because global work is by definition likely to bring employees into contact with cultural differences and culturally diverse practices, the ability to adapt smartly could be the difference between success and failure. And two, positive indifference makes work life that much easier in a global firm because employees are open to learning and exploring new terrains.”
 
2. Commonality between cultures. Similarities, just like differences, may seem small yet they can bring colleagues from different cultures closer together. Embracing common elements helps teams to bond and become more productive.
 
3. Global vs local belonging. A sense of belonging with the larger organisation rather than the local office has greater potential for commitment, understanding and job satisfaction.

4. Seeking interactions with other, geographically distant subsidiaries. Communicating with international colleagues enables:
• Shared learning and experiences
• Spread of best practice
• Greater efficiencies

“In general, when interactions are high, there is a greater ability to develop trust and shared vision among international coworkers,” explains Neeley.

5. Aspiring to a global career. The research findings show that travel, living in a new country, and the opportunities for career advancement attracted global career aspirations. For many, the advancement of a global career is linked to their ability to speak English.


“Comprehensive relocation policies give assignees the support framework for their global roles, however the attitude and approach of each individual are key to realizing the full potential of each opportunity,” says Louise Chilcott, Global Move and Relocation Specialist at BTR International.

If you would like a no-obligation review of your organisation’s international relocation policy, contact Louise via .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or call her on +44 (1) 01582 495495.


Image courtesy of Cooldesign at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Global Mobility: Predictions for 2020

Global Mobility: Predictions for 2020

The last decade has seen a 25% growth in global mobility. A further 50% rise is forecast by 2020 says pwc.
This increase is heavily influenced by technology and emerging markets, which have also impacted upon the structure and management of global workforces.

As international assignments become a necessity for many organisations, it’s good know that they are also popular with employees. The pwc report states that mobility opportunities are recognised as key to attracting, developing and engaging talent. 71% of millennials want to work outside of their home country during their career.

A New Form of Mobility
Whilst a 50% increase in mobile employees is predicted, assignments are set to change in nature. Traditionally, international assignments have involved a three/four year relocation abroad, then a return home. Instead, new forms of ‘purpose based’ mobility such as developmental rotations, reverse transfers (between emerging and mature markets for skills transfer, for example) and global nomads (regional leaders without a ‘home’ country).

Emerging Destinations
New markets have increased the number of global mobility locations offered by organisations. As emerging markets mature, so do employee reward programmes in this countries, affecting mobility demand.

Sophisticated Mobility Programmes
Changing assignment dynamics and a 50% increase in global mobility will demand more sophisticated mobility strategies. Organisations must utilise agile, adaptable and constantly evolving programmes in order to meet the specific requirements of the business and employee groups.

The Pressure on HR
HR teams will come under even more pressure to provide evidence and insight to support mobility decisions and manage programme costs. Predictive ways of thinking and analytical techniques will grow in importance.

Have you thought about how your organisation will cope with the increase in global mobility?

How flexible and robust is your international relocation policy?

Now is the time to ensure that your business can capitalise upon predicted changes within global mobility. To explore the options, have an informal discussion – without obligation – with Louise Chilcott, Global Move and Relocation Specialist from BTR International.

Contact Louise via .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or call her on +44 (0) 1582 495495. Let’s make your company’s global mobility as stress-free as possible.



Image courtesy of Nutdanai Apikhomboonwaroot.at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Work Friendships Help Relocations

Work Friendships Help Relocations

Good relationships at work help international assignees to settle faster and stay longer in their new role.
Talent management company TLNT suggests that talent activation is built upon four pillars – one of which is “encouraging meaningful employee relationships”.

This is especially true when encouraging global mobility, with work friendships facilitating quicker productivity from international assignees. This is particularly relevant for younger employees. TLNT offers powerful statistics that reinforce the role of work friendships:
• Full-time employees (54% vs. 43% of part-time employees) were more likely to say they stay with their current employers because of their co-workers.
• 60% of employees feel their relationship with their employer positively impacts their focus or productivity at work, and 44% say it positively impacts stress levels.
• 3% of millennials consider “friendly co-workers” an important work atmosphere trait.
• 88% of millennials want to be friends with their co-workers.
• The number one source of hiring for organisations is employee referrals.

How can an organisation’s relocation policy maximise this opportunity?
Two aspects are important:

1. Communication
Encourage opportunities for shared experiences and communication, offering points of connection… and fun! A regular social programme with a mix of activities with help co-workers to bond and help new assignees learn about what their location can offer.

Ensure that managers have structured yet informal meetings with team members to encourage conversation beyond purely work-based topics.

2. Culture
Emphasise the culture of the organisation during team building and feedback sessions. Sharing ideas, providing honest feedback (safely) and celebrating team and individual success help to grow work-based friendships.

“Once an assignee has arrived in their new country and started their new role, support becomes even more crucial,” says Louise Chilcott, Global Move and Relocation Specialist from BTR International. “For the relocation to be a success, individuals need to settle into their new home and work role and quickly as possible. Friendships are hugely influential – especially as co-workers may be the only people that assignees know in their new location. Support as this stage is often overlooked and should feature within every relocation policy.”

TLNT adds: “Creating meaningful relationships can form a support framework, but effectively evaluating employees’ relationships serves as a way to measure their level of activation.” The following metrics are suggested:
• Is an employee a social butterfly or do they stay isolated?
• Is an employee volunteering for teams? How many?
• Is an employee providing feedback to others? Coaching others? Seeking out feedback/guidance?
• Is an employee actively recruiting friends and colleagues to apply for open positions within the organisation?

Learning from the results helps individual engagement and team performance to be analysed. This allows best practices and relocation support options to be identified.

Louise says: “The quicker an assignee bonds with their co-workers, the more successful the relocation and the team become. It’s win-win situation however it relies on a support framework being in place.”

If you would like to know more, or to discuss your organisation’s relocation policy, contact Louise for an informal discussion without obligation. Email her via   .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or call +44 (0)1582 495 495.
Spotting Reluctant Relocations

Spotting Reluctant Relocations

For most people, relocating overseas is a little daunting and very exciting. However some people simply don’t relish international assignments. Spotting the signs can prevent costly U-turns and longer settlement periods…
Recruitment specialist Mike Evers told Inside Counsel magazine: “The reality of moving is different from the thought of moving.” He added: “we have gotten pretty good at figuring out who is willing to pull the trigger on such a major life change. That assessment is just as important as matching credentials and culture fit.”

According to Evers, there are five useful signs to spot when assessing whether an assignee will be genuinely enthusiastic about the prospect of relocating to a new country:

1. Single vs Partners
Single people relocate alone – without the support of a partner in their new location. They will be starting a new personal life on their own. This means they may take longer to settle into their new role and country.

2. Early Family Involvement
The earlier an assignee involves their spouse and family in reviewing information and asking for details, the more successful the relocation is likely to be. Any progress along the acceptance route without the clear involvement of the employee’s spouse signposts problems ahead.

3. Children
Relocations that involve older children are very difficult. Evers states that: “Even more than a reluctant spouse, teenage children have tremendous influence in this process. Almost without exception, our successful relocation experiences have involved candidates with young kids or no kids.”

4. Resume Clues
Looking at potential assignees’ work history, those who have already worked or lived overseas are most likely to settle quickly in an international relocation.

5. Recruiting Externally?
It is often assumed that, when recruiting externally, someone who is currently unemployed will be more open to the idea of moving abroad. Evers explains: “It’s a bad assumption, and this is actually the most common cold feet scenario. Currently employed candidates tend to do a good job of thinking through the location before investing time and effort in an interview process.  Conversely, and understandably, unemployed candidates seize interview opportunities and always show great enthusiasm early.  The relocation reality check tends to hit them later in the process.”

BTR International has been helping assignees to relocate to new countries for over 30 years. “As well as helping with the physical move, we help assignees and their families to fit into their new surroundings and integrate into to the local culture,” says Louise Chilcott, Global Move and Relocation Specialist from BTR International.

She adds: “This aspect can make or break the success of an international relocation. Spotting potential problems and discussing them as soon as possible can stop them from escalating further along the relocation process, causing problems for the individuals and organisation involved.”

To find out more or discuss your relocation requirements without obligation, contact Louise via  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or call +44 (0)1582 495 495.
It’s Official: London is Europe’s most dynamic city

It’s Official: London is Europe’s most dynamic city

A new report places London at the top of the list of Europe’s most dynamic cities. What is this based upon?
Savill’s Investment Management analysed cities across Europe, using six categories:
1. Innovation
2. Inspiration
3. Inclusion
4. Interconnection
5. Investment
6. Infrastructure

Despite the uncertainty created by Brexit and the current political climate, London is predicted to remain a leading city during the long term. This is partly due to the London infrastructure plan 2050.

The London Infrastructure Plan 2050 is the first ever attempt to identify, prioritise and cost London’s future infrastructure to 2050, given London's growth. Costing around £1trn, services such as:
• Transport
• Green infrastructure
• Digital connectivity
• Energy
• Water
• Waste

5 Most Dynamic Cities in Europe:
1. London
2. Paris
3. Cambridge
4. Amsterdam
5. Berlin

Kiran Patel, chief investment officer at Savills Investment Management, said: “Europe’s most dynamic cities are future-proofing themselves by creating environments that encourage the growth of a ‘knowledge economy,’ which will increasingly drive wealth creation.

“The report shows that size isn’t everything: while some ‘supercities’ such as London and Paris are consolidating their already dominant positions, smaller cities such as Cambridge, Edinburgh, Dublin and Stockholm are well positioned to grow in influence over the coming years.” 

“Dynamic cities embrace global mobility,” says Louise Chilcott, Global Move and Relocation specialist from BTR International. “If your organisation would like to move people to or from these locations, we can help ensure that their relocation is as stress-free as possible.”

If you would like to know more, or discuss your organisation’s relocation policy or requirements, contact Louise for an informal discussion without obligation. Email her via  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or call +44 (0)1582 495 495.


Image courtesy of Vichaya Kiatying-Angsulee at FreeDigitalPhotos.net